The Human Harp at The Brooklyn Bridge

The Human Harp is a project using movement of a performer connected to the interface to create music and ‘play’ the bridge. The interface is a number of modules with string/sensors which attach to the performer. The sensors capture the rate, length and angle of the string pull and translate those movements through Max/MSP to produce synthesized sounds via granular synthesis. The inspiration for artist Di Mainstone was looking out over the Brooklyn Bridge and thinking how much it looked – and sounded through the hum of the cables in the wind – like a harp.

“As I listened to the hum of the steel suspension cables, the chatter of visitors and the musical ‘clonks’ of their footsteps along the bridge’s wooden walkway, I wondered if these sounds could be recorded, remixed and replayed through a collaborative digital interface? Mirroring the steel suspension cables of the bridge, I decided that this clip-on device could be harp-like, with retractable strings that physically attach the user or Movician’s body to the bridge, literally turning them into a human harp.”

(via @JoBrodie)

Extracting Audio From a Mix by Singing It – Source Separation via Input Matching

Paris Smaragdis is an assistant professor at the University of Illinois who specializes in research that involves machine listening. This includes source localization (where the sound is coming from), sound recognition (such as a traffic accident at an intersection) and source separation (taking individual voices or instruments out of a mix). Source separation is a

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