Higher Sampling Rates – When is Higher Better?

Here’s a great article from Trust Me I’m A Scientist explaining sampling rates and the advantages and disadvantages of higher sampling rates. This is probably the most balanced, detailed and above all accurate article I’ve read on the topic which as we all know has passionate folks in both camps. Well worth a look

Share this post
  , ,


4 thoughts on “Higher Sampling Rates – When is Higher Better?

  1. An article that confuses sampling and quantizing does not qualify as accurate. Harry’s sampling algorithm enabled Bell to earn million$, if not billion$, long before digital audio became popular.

    In practice, oversampling offers few benefits over upsampling, which enables more flexibility in filter design.

  2. Thanks for the comment! Can you explain where sampling and distortion are confused in the article? He doesn’t refer to quantization in the article itself, is that the issue?

    As for upsampling vs oversampling, I think you’re right, the only benefit I can really see for oversampling is if a plugin blindly processes at whatever sampling rate you feed it, (ie it can handle higher sample rates but will process at 44.1kHz if that’s what you’re working at, in which case that’s just bad design).

    • > Can you explain where sampling and distortion are confused in the article?

      Sampling and quantization.

      The article implies that sampling’s first consumer application was digital,
      ignoring that it was previously essential to long distance telephony and high fidelity
      magnetic recording.

      > He doesn’t refer to quantization in the article itself, is that the issue?

      Partly, given that (above the antialiasing limit), quantization resolution can be traded-off against
      sample rate.

      “By 1947, he had made his most lasting contribution:
      a mathematical proof that showed any sound wave could be perfectly re-created
      so long as it was limited in bandwidth and sampled at a rate more than twice its own frequency.”

      That would be Claude Shannon’s reconstruction filter proof.
      Harry’s 2x oversampling rule was published in the 1920s.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *